Rosemary’s Baby (1968): Classic Review

There is little I can say about Roman Polanski’s seminal 1968 horror marvel, Rosemary’s Baby, which hasn’t already been written, so I’ll simply preface this review by saying that I believe this film is the pinnacle of the horror genre and possesses everything that many modern day horror films sadly lack. I tend to stray away from the…

Swiss Army Man: Review

‘Maybe everyone’s a little bit ugly. Yeah, maybe we’re all just ugly, dying sacks of shit and maybe all it’ll take is one person to just be okay with that.’ If you were to be skeptical about the premise of directing duo, The Daniels’ (Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert) widely-discussed new comedy drama, Swiss Army Man,…

For the love of Louis Theroux

In the build-up to Louis Theroux’s upcoming Scientology film, set for cinema release on 14th October, it’s hugely interesting to reflect on the work of one of the UK’s most prolific and revered documentary filmmakers. Taking into account the scale of his ever increasing repertoire, it’s hard to predict Theroux’s next step, with his impressive…

Hunt For The Wilderpeople: Review

Following the astounding cult, and in recent months mainstream, success of Taika Waititi’s hilarious 2014 vampire mockumentary, What We Do In The Shadows, his fourth feature film, Hunt For The Wilderpeople, was something I simply had to see. If it was anything like the former, I knew I’d be in for a creative and fantastically-written…

Stranger Things & the future of TV

At this point in time, writing an article about Netflix’s critically acclaimed 1980s-set science fiction series, Stranger Things, feels almost redundant, a show so well received by audiences that you’d be hard-pressed to find a topic more widely discussed this summer. What’s particularly interesting about the show, aside from its compelling narrative, array of intriguing characters and wonderful 80s…

One More Time With Feeling: Review

One More Time With Feeling is Andrew Dominik’s exquisite new documentary chronicling the writing and recording of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ sixteenth studio album, Skeleton Tree. It also takes a look beneath the surface of the richly-textured and mournful tapestry which makes up the private world of Nick Cave and his wife Susie, following the death of their…

Some Like It Hot (1959): Classic Review

1959’s Some Like It Hot is one of the most standout films of Billy Wilder’s illustrious directorial career (Sunset Boulevard, The Apartment, Double Indemnity). Shamefully, I only just had the pleasure of watching Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon and Marilyn Monroe’s charming performances as Jerry/Geraldine and Joe/Josephine, two musicians on the run after witnessing a mob murder, and Sugar Kane,…

A few words on Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ trilogy

I recently finished Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ trilogy, and the final film left such an indelible impression on me that I felt compelled to write this post to share my thoughts on the series. Before I start, I should say that I will be talking about plot details so it’s best not to read on if you don’t want to…

Girls on Film: The female taboo

Something that saddens me about the film industry is the ongoing and indisputable lack of female representation in cinema, an issue which is continually attested, yet still rebuffed by some. This isn’t to say that wonderful female-led films don’t exist, of course, with many of my most memorable viewing experiences of the last few years taking…

Barry Lyndon (1975): Classic Review

‘It was in the reign of George II that the above-named personages lived and quarreled; good or bad, handsome or ugly, rich or poor, they are all equal now.’ I’m not quite sure how to start this review, because I feel that nothing I say will be able to truly capture how strongly I felt…

The 400 Blows (1959): Classic Review

‘Your parents say you’re always lying.’ ‘Oh, I lie now and then, I suppose. Sometimes I’d tell them the truth and they still wouldn’t believe me, so I prefer to lie.’ The 400 Blows, or Les Quatres cents coups if you want to refer to it by its French title, is widely regarded as one…

Suicide Squad: Review

The first thing I’d like to point out in this review is that Suicide Squad, David Ayer’s hotly-anticipated contribution to the quickly expanding new DC universe, is certainly not as terrible as the recent onslaught of damning reviews would have you believe. I entered the cinema with extremely low expectations, and was met with a complete…