Discussing the works of Sofia Coppola

In anticipation of one of 2017’s most anticipated films, The Beguiled, which is hot on the lips of both ardent filmgoers and Cannes critics alike, I was keen to write a few words about its director, Sofia Coppola, and her suitably beguiling body of work, her impact on myself as a viewer, and her ongoing influence…

20th Century Women: Review

20th Century Women has a certain melancholic euphoria about it that I can’t quite articulate with words. A soul-cleansing, masterful tapestry of multi-faceted characters and their experiences, the film’s beauty is characterised predominantly by Mike Mills’ exceptional screenplay. Based in part on his own mother, Mills pens an enriching and captivating amalgamation of scenes, woven together by…

The Salesman: Review

Following his critically-acclaimed 2011 marriage drama, A Separation, Asghar Farhadi is a director whose name has been at the forefront of world cinema for some years now. Fuelling his noteworthy presence even further was his decision to boycott this year’s 89th Academy Awards ceremony on account of Donald Trump’s ban on travellers entering the US from seven…

Toni Erdmann: Review

Oh Toni Erdmann, where oh where do I start? Maren Ade’s German language dark comedy, Toni Erdmann, is an exercise in sheer brilliance; outlandish, nihilistic and hilarious in its approach to the events surrounding the strange relationship between career-driven business consultant, Ines (Sandra Hüller) and her estranged father, Winifried (Peter Simonischek). This film was a complete breath of fresh…

Jackie: Review

Pablo Larraín’s Jackie is both stunning and startling in its painful, yet illuminating take on the life and experiences of perhaps America’s most noteworthy First Lady, Jackie Kennedy, in the wake of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. There is so much to admire about the director’s careful assembly of elements that produce a film which captures both…

Silence: Review

From the silence unfolds the sound of insects, rainfall, chirping birds and wind whistling through the hills: nature’s very own cacophony. From this rich canopy of sounds emerges the familiar husk of the voice of Liam Neeson, or rather, Father Ferreira as he is known here. He introduces us to the premise of Martin Scorsese’s long-awaited Silence, as…

Days of Heaven (1978): Classic Review

When viewing the earlier work of any director, it is often interesting to note the creative hallmarks and tendencies manifested within their films which later went on to define their directorial style. Terence Malick is no exception to this, with earlier works like 1974’s Badlands and the subject of this very review, Days of Heaven exemplifying the grandiose…

2016 in Review: Top 10 Films

‘It’s a sad and beautiful world’ – Jim Jarmusch Here we are at the end of what has been a hugely exciting year for film. I feel as though some of the best were saved until last, but from beginning to end there have been some real gems this year, and what pleases me most is how original and distinctive…

Nocturnal Animals: Review

Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals is surely a contender for being one of the most beguiling, well-crafted and explosively gripping films of 2016, containing some of the year’s most outstanding performances and one of its most original narrative structures. My first time viewing it was an intense and truly memorable cinema experience, and one I haven’t been able to…

Network (1976): Classic Review

‘I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Network is arguably one of the 1970s’ most underrated gems, and pleasantly surprised me in how alarmingly relevant and fantastically entertaining it is. This isn’t to say I wasn’t expecting it to be good – it is allegedly one of Paul Thomas Anderson’s favourite…

American Honey: Review

I’m not sure where to start when it comes to discussing American Honey, as it appears to have polarised audiences to the extent that the only way to ascertain its quality, or lack thereof, is to watch it for yourself. The appeal of this film is seemingly very personal, with its array of vibrant and memorable…

Black Mirror ~ San Junipero: Episode Review

The latest season of Black Mirror, Charlie Brooker’s satirical sci-fi anthology series, boasts a diverse range of brand new and, at times, unexpected concepts; all equally terrifying in their alarmingly plausible examination of our collective technological fixation. San Junipero, the season’s fourth episode, is no exception to this, as where the other episodes tend to present…